STAY HEALTHY. STAY OUT OF THE ER.


We love interacting with the people of the Laredo community, but we’d much rather do it outside the ER than inside it. Keep up with the latest knowledge from our professionals to help keep yourself in the peak of health.




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23/Jan/2019

While the New Year starts to roll in and you begin to prepare for wholesome January or another popular cleanse diet, ask yourself this, is it worth putting your body through this stress?

We all recognize that these diets may get the job done now, but let’s try to think about what the best options are for long-term healthy lifestyle.

The debate between dieting and lifestyle changes has been going on for years. We know this can be confusing for the individuals trying to find the best option for them and their health, so we here at the Laredo Emergency Room want to give you the facts so you can make the best decision for you and your needs.

While getting ready to start your new health craze, ask yourself a few questions, does your diet make specific foods off limits? Has this diet promised unrealistic weight loss goals over a short time period? Finally, has it promised to help you lose weight without exercising?

If you answered yes to any of the following questions, chances are you’re looking at a fad diet. Fad or trendy diets are not always a bad thing, but depending on its implementation, they can lead to more severe health consequences later down the road.

When dieting, results tend to show faster, but nutritionists and doctors report that losing weight quickly over an extended period of time may appear to be a healthy jumpstart, but in actuality, is quite the opposite.

These extreme, fast-paced weight-loss regimens can make you think you are shedding those unwanted pounds, but instead of weight, you are dropping a high proportion of water mass, or even losing muscle tissue. By limiting your nutritional intake, this process can be very unhealthy.

Since the majority of diets are considered temporary, most likely you will eventually fluctuate back to your original weight. Professionals call this fluctuation of weight ‘yo-yo dieting’, and while the term might sound harmless enough, the repetition of this dieting method can take a severe toll on your body that can lead to health problems later down the road. In response to this, doctors are now emphasizing the importance of maintaining a healthy regime by adjusting their lifestyle, rather than dieting, in order to maintain peak mental and physical health.

Managing and maintaining a healthy lifestyle does not result from a short-term dietary change. Rather, it’s about making a long-term commitment to change that includes healthy eating, regular physical activity, and balancing the number of calories eaten alongside the calories the body uses.

Although the term ‘lifestyle change’ sounds intimidating, it’s all about making small modifications that lead to a significant result. Results may take longer to notice, but the body is then able to maintain a healthy, and sustainable weight loss rate, which is around 1 to 2 pounds per week.
The key to making a lifestyle change last is creating a realistic plan that you are confident you can maintain. The most critical element to being able to implement this change into your day-to-day regimen is progressing as the process becomes more normalized. Therefore make sure you start small and break down your overall goal into manageable steps. Making a lifestyle change is not an easy job, but it is the most beneficial for your health. If you can, involve a friend for support. It will make the process much less intimidating. There are also support groups in your community and online that have other people just like you who are making healthy lifestyle changes.

So remember when you think that making a lifestyle change sounds hard compared to dieting, don’t forget that there is a massive difference in weight loss and being healthy, and dieting gets in the way of long-lasting change.

Check out these 4 habits you can start right now for a better, healthier life.

For more health tips, follow us on Facebook! Laredo Emergency Room is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.


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23/Jan/2019

Let’s face it: nobody’s perfect. And with the holidays, it’s easy to give ourselves plenty of excuses for not exercising and eating right. But excuses and holidays aside, too many of us adopt poor health habits all throughout the year, and one of the worst is a sedentary lifestyle. The National Institutes of Health reminds us that we humans were “designed to move” and that our very survival depended upon it. Yet our modern world is forcing us more and more into activities that restrict physical movement, whether in our homes, in our cars, or at work.

A sedentary lifestyle can be learned from childhood if you grew up with few active role models and opportunities for exercise. It can be the result of chronic illness, pain, or injury. It also can sneak into your otherwise once healthy life gradually and in many ways, overtaking one hour here and another there as you trade more physical activities for those less rigorous. With the rise of electronic media and the many ways to consume it, people are becoming even more sedentary than ever, as they binge on entire television seasons, play endless hours of video games, and participate in social media.

The real problem with living a sedentary life is that is comes with real consequences and serious risks to your health,[ https://medlineplus.gov/healthrisksofaninactivelifestyle.html] including:

* Slowing metabolism, resulting in weight gain

* Loss of muscle and endurance

* Metabolic syndrome and Type 2 diabetes

* Heart diseases and stroke

* Poor blood circulation, increased blood pressure, and increased cholesterol

* Weaker bones and osteoporosis

* Rise in inflammation

* And even hormone imbalance, depression, and anxiety In fact, Laredo Emergency Room cares for countless patients who suffer from these conditions, all too many the result of sedentary lifestyles. While catching up on the latest 12 episodes of your favorite show comes with a steep cost, there is good news.

Just as a more sedentary lifestyle can creep in almost unnoticed, a more healthy, active lifestyle can begin gradually with just a few simple swaps.

In fact, starting slowly is the safest way to build more exercise into your daily routine:

* Do more chores around the home – housework, do-it-yourself repairs, and yard work are great exercise.

* Walk laps around the room when you talk on the phone and dance when you listen to music.

* Cook instead of going out to eat – the activity in the kitchen gets you moving, and you’re more likely to eat healthfully when you prepare your meals yourself.

* Use the stairs instead of an elevator wherever you go.

* Park farther away from building entrances.

* Do chair exercises at work and take frequent breaks to stretch and walk for even a couple of minutes.

* Choose one new hobby to get you doing something more active; even “sitting” hobbies, like crafting or working jigsaw puzzles, get you moving more than the television does.

* Do floor exercises or yoga poses while you watch TV – and use social media to support and keep you accountable to a healthy lifestyle.

However you work more physical activity into your daily routine, your body will thank you for it. Your body needs to move to be healthy, and Laredo Emergency Room wants it to stay that way.

For more health tips, follow us on Facebook! Laredo Emergency Room is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.


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23/Jan/2019

The holiday season is near, and no one wants to feel bad during the happiest time of the year. The cold and flu season always seems to start earlier and more aggressively than the year before, which is why it is important to stay ahead of the virus by taking precautions to avoid the cold and flu. While there is no 100% guarantee that you can prevent the cold and flu, we have a few tips you can use to help strengthen your immune system and avoid catching the cold and flu this season!

  • Wash your hands frequently: One of the best ways to prevent the common cold and flu is to wash your hands. As we touch public doors, buttons, bathroom door handles, and come into close contact with a sick co-worker or a significant other, we then touch our face transferring bacteria and viruses causing germs to easily enter the body. Biotherm states that on average you touch your face 2000 to 3000 times per day – which is 2 to 5 times a minute! LER recommends washing your hands shortly after interaction with public objects. The proper way to wash your hands is to use soap and warm water. Scrub hands for at least 20 seconds. Rinse well with water and finally dry with a towel. Another way to prevent the cold and flu is to utilize hand sanitizer. Apply throughout the day to stay germ-free.

 

  • Drink plenty of water: By staying hydrated, you can flush out bad toxins in your body, which will allow you to recover faster and stay hydrated. Although water is best, hot tea is also a doctor’s recommendation because it has antioxidants. Drinking hot tea can deliver instant and constant relief from a runny nose, coughing, sneezing, sore throat, chilliness, and tiredness. Whether it’s water or tea, keep hydrated with plenty of fluids to strengthen your immune system.

 

  • Flu vaccinations: Staying up to date with yearly vaccinations is important. If you’re waiting for your symptoms to worsen, it’s too late. Every year, the flu causes hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations and thousands of deaths. The flu shot is available to help protect people from the virus. We encourage you to visit your primary care physician, or your closest CVS or Walgreens, to receive this year’s vaccination. According to CDC, by getting the flu shot you are reducing the risk of having to visit the doctor due to the flu by 30 percent to 60 percent. Get the flu shot today, before it’s too late!

 

Though cold and flu season is here, following these health tips can help you maintain a strong immune system and recover faster should you get sick. If you have any questions or concerns about your personal health or if the flu shot is right for you, contact your doctor to discuss other possible safe solutions for you and your family.

 

For more health tips, follow us on Facebook! Laredo Emergency Room is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

 


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23/Jan/2019

Most often, when the topic of cancer and women’s health comes up, people first think about breast cancer. It’s got a lot of marketing power behind it – its own month, its own signature color, and several highly publicized annual fundraisers complete with celebrity spokeswomen. Because of the prominence breast cancer is given – and the education about the disease that comes with it – women are more likely to have routine screening and to recognize possible signs that will prompt them to seek out medical attention.

However, at Laredo Emergency Room, we are seeking to shine the spotlight on another disease that’s taking the lives of thousands of women each year: ovarian cancer, which begins in the ovaries, the two small reproductive organs in which a woman’s eggs are produced. While the American Cancer Society ranks ovarian cancer fifth for cancer deaths among women, it’s still a very deadly disease – because while fewer women get cancer of the ovaries, it causes more deaths than any other cancer of female reproductive organs.

While a variety of tests, such as pelvic exams, ultrasounds, and biopsies, can help a physician diagnose ovarian cancer once it is suspected, the main problem lies in that there are no routine screenings for ovarian cancer. This means that more often than not, ovarian cancer has progressed to an advanced stage before it is caught.

A second problem is that ovarian cancer brings with it an assortment of ambiguous symptoms such as bloating, pelvic or abdominal pain, a need to urinate frequently or urgently, and feeling full quickly during meals. The Ovarian Cancer Research Fund Alliance also warns that fatigue, pain in the back or with intercourse, constipation, and menstrual irregularities can also signal the presence of ovarian cancer. Ovarian cancer symptoms can even include gas, nausea, vomiting, or loss of appetite, along with weight fluctuations.

These are symptoms that we know many women wouldn’t even come to Laredo Emergency Room to treat, even though a deadly disease is lurking underneath. That’s because the symptoms of ovarian cancer are so generalized and easily mistaken for signs of other women’s health conditions or even simply for issues with diet or stress.

Because ovarian cancer is so sly and therefore difficult to catch in its earliest stages, the best course of action for women is to become knowledgeable of their own risk factors for the disease:

  1. 1. Women of advancing age – About half of all women diagnosed with ovarian cancer are age 63 and older.
  2. 2. Women who never had children or had children later – Not having a full-term pregnancy by the age of 35 puts women at greater risk for ovarian cancer.
  3. 3. Women who have undergone IVF – In vitro fertilization treatment increases a woman’s risk of certain types of ovarian cancers.
  4. 4. Women who take hormone therapy – Using estrogens after menopause can increase a woman’s risk for ovarian cancer.
  5. 5. Women with a personal or family history of cancers – If a woman has had breast cancer – or has a family history of breast or ovarian cancer – she is at greater risk.

While knowing your personal risk factors for ovarian cancer and any women’s health concerns can help you become more self-awareand more likely to start the right kinds of conversation with your physician


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