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STAY HEALTHY. STAY OUT OF THE ER.


We love interacting with the people of the Laredo community, but we’d much rather do it outside the ER than inside it. Keep up with the latest knowledge from our professionals to help keep yourself in the peak of health.




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20/Jan/2020

As the prevalence of diabetes continues to rise, it’s becoming known as the new silent killer. And because about 10% of all adult emergency room visits stem from diabetes-related symptoms or complications, what you don’t know about diabetes could hurt you … or even kill you. So, as we celebrate American Diabetes Month in November, there’s never been a better time to know more about diabetes, what to watch for, and how to live vibrantly with it.

Why awareness matters

In the United States, an estimated 84 million people live with diabetes, and in addition to being one of the leading causes of trips to the emergency room or urgent care, it’s also one of the leading causes of death. Because symptoms often don’t appear until the condition is somewhat advanced, many people have diabetes or pre-diabetes and don’t even know it.

Who’s most at risk

Advancing age puts people at risk for type 2 (adult onset) diabetes, as more than 85% of those with diabetes are age 45 or older. You’re at high risk for diabetes if you are overweight, lead a sedentary lifestyle, or if diabetes runs in your family.

Children and young adults are more often diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, which tends to run in families. Pregnant women can get gestational diabetes and are typically tested for it near the end of the second trimester.

What you can do

If you have any risk factors for type 2 diabetes, get tested regularly. All that’s needed is a simple blood test. If the results show you have diabetes or pre-diabetes but have not yet experienced symptoms, this gives you an early opportunity to get the disease under control.

In addition to following orders from your primary care physician, the following tips can also help:

  • Think of food as fuel for a healthy lifestyle. Too often, people who need to lose weight in order to get their diabetes (or risk for it) in check head straight into the latest fad diet. While such diets may help you have a short-term success, they are often so restrictive that most people can’t – and shouldn’t – stick with them for the long term. Instead of depriving yourself, plan your meals to include healthy fats, whole grains, lean proteins, and plenty of vegetables and fruits. You’ll feel satisfied and be able to stick with it for life.

  • Get preventive care. Keeping a regular schedule of checkups can help your primary care physician identify subtle symptoms or problems lurking in the background – so you can address them early and avoid trips to urgent care or the emergency room.

  • Increase your physical activity in manageable steps. Find small opportunities for adding activity to your day, such as taking the stairs instead of the elevator – or parking at the back of the lot and walking farther. Gradually adding more and more exercise to your routine is the best way to incorporate it into your lifestyle for good.

The best news about type 2 diabetes is that it can be reversed – with the right care and lifestyle. So be aware of your risks and talk to your doctor about any concerns you might have.

For more health tips, follow us on Facebook! Laredo Emergency Room is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.


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20/Jan/2020

Diabetes is a huge concern that many of us are aware of. With 30.3 million individuals in the U.S. living with some form of diabetes, only about two-thirds of those are professionally diagnosed, meaning almost 7.2 million individuals go undiagnosed with this condition. Diabetes cases in our country on the rise, and it is vital that we stay as informed on this disease and it’s risks as possible, taking note of the lifestyle changes that can help you prevent it’s onset.

Although many Americans are able to continue living their life after being diagnosed with one of the four types of diabetes with minimal issues, there can be serious consequences if this condition goes untreated or mismanaged. Health problems such as blindness, kidney failure, heart disease, heart disease, stroke, dental disease, and nerve damage can arise if you are not taking steps to properly deal with your diagnosis.

While there are certain factors you can’t change — such as your genes, age, or past behaviors — there are many actions you can take to reduce the risk of developing this disease. The first and most important step is cutting sugars and refined carbs from your diet. These foods can put you on the fast track towards developing diabetes due to the body having to rapidly break these foods down into smaller sugars that getting absorbed into the bloodstream, causing continuous high blood pressure. Working out is also a huge lifestyle adjustment that you can make to combat developing diabetes. Losing even a small amount of weight can help reduce this risk.

Drinking water as your beverage of choice can be vital. Sugary drinks like sodas have been linked to an increased risk of developing both type 1 and 2 diabetes. Although water should be your primary drink, research suggests that including unsweetened coffee or tea in your diet may help you avoid this chronic condition because they contain antioxidants that help defend against diabetes by reducing blood sugar levels and increases insulin sensitivity.

Unfortunately, these preventive steps that you can take don’t result in overnight changes to your risk of developing diabetes, but these are changes that are meant to inspire and create a new, healthy lifestyle. Cases of diabetes are rising, but you do have control over several of the determining factors that will affect your chances of diagnoses.

If you have been diagnosed with prediabetes, instead of accepting it as a transitional process to the eventual diabetes diagnoses, motivate yourself to make these changes that reduce your risks. Eating the right foods and adopting other healthy, positive lifestyle behaviors promote healthy blood sugar and insulin levels, which will give you the best chance at preventing this disease.

For more health tips, follow us on Facebook! Laredo Emergency Room is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.


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