STAY HEALTHY. STAY OUT OF THE ER.


We love interacting with the people of the Laredo community, but we’d much rather do it outside the ER than inside it. Keep up with the latest knowledge from our professionals to help keep yourself in the peak of health.




No more posts
Diabetes-1200x669.png
17/Nov/2019

As the prevalence of diabetes continues to rise, it’s becoming known as the new silent killer. And because about 10% of all adult emergency room visits stem from diabetes-related symptoms or complications, what you don’t know about diabetes could hurt you … or even kill you. So, as we celebrate American Diabetes Month in November, there’s never been a better time to know more about diabetes, what to watch for, and how to live vibrantly with it.

Why awareness matters

In the United States, an estimated 84 million people live with diabetes, and in addition to being one of the leading causes of trips to the emergency room or urgent care, it’s also one of the leading causes of death. Because symptoms often don’t appear until the condition is somewhat advanced, many people have diabetes or pre-diabetes and don’t even know it.

Who’s most at risk

Advancing age puts people at risk for type 2 (adult onset) diabetes, as more than 85% of those with diabetes are age 45 or older. You’re at high risk for diabetes if you are overweight, lead a sedentary lifestyle, or if diabetes runs in your family.

Children and young adults are more often diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, which tends to run in families. Pregnant women can get gestational diabetes and are typically tested for it near the end of the second trimester.

What you can do

If you have any risk factors for type 2 diabetes, get tested regularly. All that’s needed is a simple blood test. If the results show you have diabetes or pre-diabetes but have not yet experienced symptoms, this gives you an early opportunity to get the disease under control.

In addition to following orders from your primary care physician, the following tips can also help:

  • Think of food as fuel for a healthy lifestyle. Too often, people who need to lose weight in order to get their diabetes (or risk for it) in check head straight into the latest fad diet. While such diets may help you have a short-term success, they are often so restrictive that most people can’t – and shouldn’t – stick with them for the long term. Instead of depriving yourself, plan your meals to include healthy fats, whole grains, lean proteins, and plenty of vegetables and fruits. You’ll feel satisfied and be able to stick with it for life.

  • Get preventive care. Keeping a regular schedule of checkups can help your primary care physician identify subtle symptoms or problems lurking in the background – so you can address them early and avoid trips to urgent care or the emergency room.

  • Increase your physical activity in manageable steps. Find small opportunities for adding activity to your day, such as taking the stairs instead of the elevator – or parking at the back of the lot and walking farther. Gradually adding more and more exercise to your routine is the best way to incorporate it into your lifestyle for good.

The best news about type 2 diabetes is that it can be reversed – with the right care and lifestyle. So be aware of your risks and talk to your doctor about any concerns you might have.

For more health tips, follow us on Facebook! Laredo Emergency Room is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.


healthy-body-1200x797.png
17/Nov/2019

This is the year! You’re finally going to achieve full “summer body” status – you’re going to eat right, work out regularly, slim down, and keep the weight off. Does this goal ring a bell? With the month of June knocking on our door, many of us are thinking about summer activities and all of the fun things we want to do when the warmest months of the year are upon us, but the thought of getting in a bathing suit can be intimidating and can lead to crash diets that don’t produce lasting results. The good news is that this CAN be the year you work to get that summer body and keep it that way for fall and winter if you start with aiming for a healthy body, rather than just a skinny one.

Start Small
When trying to implement any major health adjustment or lifestyle change, it’s important to have reasonable expectations – any lasting change to your health doesn’t happen overnight! If you haven’t been working out, start by walking around your neighborhood or joining one of our local Laredo gyms. If you have a regular workout routine, think about changing things up to give your body a fresh jump start. This is also an excellent time to introduce a well-balanced diet so that you’re not counteracting the workouts with food that is not going to nourish your body.

Work Up
Now that you’ve had some time to warm up to working out more regularly, it’s time to up the intensity. Exercises that are high intensity and high-calorie burning can be great for toning and weight loss. Running, interval training, dance cardio, and swimming are all great ways to burn a high number of calories. If you are continuing to eat healthy, intensifying your workouts will help you lose weight and tone up naturally.

Maintain
Hopefully, you have now reached the point of healthy, fit, and ready – ready to put that bathing suit on and hit the pool! They key now is maintaining the new healthy lifestyle that you have worked hard to build. Keep up with your work out and meal plans, take steps to de-stress, and make sure you’re visiting your doctor for your yearly exams. This healthy state of mind can help foster overall wellness and also help prevent disease or illness. It’s also important to keep in mind that anything worth working towards takes time and that nothing worth having will come easily! Taking care of yourself this summer is important. Encourage yourself, stick to the plan, work hard, and don’t sweat it if you want to have a cheat day or take a break from the gym. A healthy body will come in time as long as you keep the goal in mind and are taking steps to get there.

Be sure and show us your results by tagging us on Facebook! Getting healthy, looking good, and staying healthy and happy feels good, doesn’t it

For more health tips, follow us on Facebook! Laredo Emergency Room is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.


Screen-Shot-2019-05-22-at-5.38.18-PM-1200x706.png
17/Nov/2019

They say that you’re only young once, and life in your 20’s can certainly seem like there is no other choice but to have as much fun as possible! But now you’re in your 30’s, and making lifestyle adjustments in these next few years can go a long way in repairing the damage that your younger self may have done to your body – staying up late, excessive drinking, maybe even smoking or not staying physically active. These transformative years can help get your health back on track, and we have a few tips and lifestyle changes to help you do it.

The first step to achieving a healthy lifestyle is the mental will to get there. Adults in their late twenties to early thirties experience a lot of unneeded stress, mostly due to professional or personal life issues. While the demanding responsibilities that we face during this time of our lives can be stressful and exhausting, there are small exercises you can do to help make the stressors of life more bearable. A great example is journaling or making a list – putting pen to paper to get your responsibilities and anxiety out of your head can make it easier to prioritize and identify them, and eventually overcome them.

Whether you’ve spent the last few years focused on climbing the corporate ladder or have been too stressed to worry about sleep, now is the time to take back control of your sleep schedule. Did you know that not getting enough sleep can cause hormonal imbalances, which can affect the overall health of your body and can lead to serious health issues later in life? If you find yourself having trouble falling or staying asleep, try keeping your cell phone and computer on do not disturb after a certain hour. The blue light that these devices give off can keep you awake for hours after logging off, and less screen time can also be good for your eyes and mental state.

Regular exercise is an essential step in being healthy at any age. Some good options for getting back into the work out state-of-mind, especially if you’ve been out of the game for a while, is to get up and walk for 30 minutes every morning, sign up for a yoga class, go spinning, or reach out to a personal trainer for weekly workouts until confident enough to exercise on your own. Whatever it is you choose to do, finding something you love will help you stick to a routine!

A great way to make working out a regular habit is to take the ‘cue and reward’ approach. For example, if you want to become a regular runner in the morning, you would first need to start running at the same time every day which creates a cue, and then rewarding yourself with an episode of your favorite show after the run. Doing this repeatedly will create a habit in your day-to-day life, and make it something to look forward too, rather than dread.

Weight management and nutrition goes hand-in-hand with regular workouts – often times, getting on track with one will lead to healthy adjustments for the other. A balanced diet complemented with vitamin supplements can give your body a kick-start for maintaining focus on your weight management and workout routine.

The downside of getting older is that our bodies cannot bounce back like they used to, but with age comes wisdom. With wisdom and some of our tips listed above, you have the complete power to make this stage of your life the best, most healthy one yet!

For more health tips, follow us on Facebook! Laredo Emergency Room is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.


shutterstock_1044227548-1200x800.jpg
17/Nov/2019

Diabetes is a huge concern that many of us are aware of. With 30.3 million individuals in the U.S. living with some form of diabetes, only about two-thirds of those are professionally diagnosed, meaning almost 7.2 million individuals go undiagnosed with this condition. Diabetes cases in our country on the rise, and it is vital that we stay as informed on this disease and it’s risks as possible, taking note of the lifestyle changes that can help you prevent it’s onset.

Although many Americans are able to continue living their life after being diagnosed with one of the four types of diabetes with minimal issues, there can be serious consequences if this condition goes untreated or mismanaged. Health problems such as blindness, kidney failure, heart disease, heart disease, stroke, dental disease, and nerve damage can arise if you are not taking steps to properly deal with your diagnosis.

While there are certain factors you can’t change — such as your genes, age, or past behaviors — there are many actions you can take to reduce the risk of developing this disease. The first and most important step is cutting sugars and refined carbs from your diet. These foods can put you on the fast track towards developing diabetes due to the body having to rapidly break these foods down into smaller sugars that getting absorbed into the bloodstream, causing continuous high blood pressure. Working out is also a huge lifestyle adjustment that you can make to combat developing diabetes. Losing even a small amount of weight can help reduce this risk.

Drinking water as your beverage of choice can be vital. Sugary drinks like sodas have been linked to an increased risk of developing both type 1 and 2 diabetes. Although water should be your primary drink, research suggests that including unsweetened coffee or tea in your diet may help you avoid this chronic condition because they contain antioxidants that help defend against diabetes by reducing blood sugar levels and increases insulin sensitivity.

Unfortunately, these preventive steps that you can take don’t result in overnight changes to your risk of developing diabetes, but these are changes that are meant to inspire and create a new, healthy lifestyle. Cases of diabetes are rising, but you do have control over several of the determining factors that will affect your chances of diagnoses.

If you have been diagnosed with prediabetes, instead of accepting it as a transitional process to the eventual diabetes diagnoses, motivate yourself to make these changes that reduce your risks. Eating the right foods and adopting other healthy, positive lifestyle behaviors promote healthy blood sugar and insulin levels, which will give you the best chance at preventing this disease.

For more health tips, follow us on Facebook! Laredo Emergency Room is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.


Laredo-Emergency-Room-Fitness-1200x797.jpg
17/Nov/2019

No one can be a fitness professional on their first day working out. Getting fit and maintaining a healthy lifestyle takes time, practice, and especially patience. Now that January has come to an end, those New Year’s resolutions you had set for yourself are probably starting to trickle off and becoming harder to keep up with. Staying determined with your fitness goals is not only essential but perhaps the hardest part of leading a healthy lifestyle. We know how hard this process can be, but you can keep your hard work from going to waste with a few tips on how to keep up the fit lifestyle and stay motivated with your new training regimen.

The most important key to staying motivated is to make sure you are doing all of this hard work for the right reasons. Recent studies have shown that individuals who are motivated based on external factors, such as an upcoming high school reunion, a wedding, or the pressure of a significant other pushing you to diet, will only have temporary results. Because they are motivated by a brief time frame, these individuals typically do not stick with their new routines. However, when internally motivated, basing your goals on the changes that you wish to see in yourself, the results can create a lasting lifestyle change, showing longer and more successful outcomes.

Another critical factor in maintaining a healthy training regimen is to always go at your own pace. Taking steps according to what you feel your body is ready for will keep you on the straight and steady path. As you progress and your training becomes more comfortable and a part of your daily routine, then you can slowly start to push yourself. Although this approach takes a more extended amount of time to show results, it keeps you from pushing yourself too hard, avoiding unwanted injuries and burning out too quickly.

Another great and fun way to get up and stay active is to include a friend! There will always be days where watching TV will seem much more appealing than the sight of a treadmill, so having a workout partner will help keep your eyes on the prize, hold you accountable, and help you stay motivated to reach your fitness goals.

Finally, the most important thing to keep in mind is that everyone starts at different levels of fitness. While these famous instructors talk about their “tried and true” workout methods, and while they may work for other individuals, this does not guarantee that they will work for you. Everyone’s body is different, and so whether you are starting at level 5 or level 0, the most critical key is to stay positive and stick to a training program that’s healthy for you and your specific fitness level. Maintaining your physical and mental fitness is not about how fast you can get to the end result, it is about implementing a lifestyle change at a pace that works for you and your body!

Learn 9 ways you can stay healthy and active while working in an office. 

For more health tips, follow us on Facebook! Laredo Emergency Room is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.


Lifestyle-1200x800.jpg
17/Nov/2019

While the New Year starts to roll in and you begin to prepare for wholesome January or another popular cleanse diet, ask yourself this, is it worth putting your body through this stress?

We all recognize that these diets may get the job done now, but let’s try to think about what the best options are for long-term healthy lifestyle.

The debate between dieting and lifestyle changes has been going on for years. We know this can be confusing for the individuals trying to find the best option for them and their health, so we here at the Laredo Emergency Room want to give you the facts so you can make the best decision for you and your needs.

While getting ready to start your new health craze, ask yourself a few questions, does your diet make specific foods off limits? Has this diet promised unrealistic weight loss goals over a short time period? Finally, has it promised to help you lose weight without exercising?

If you answered yes to any of the following questions, chances are you’re looking at a fad diet. Fad or trendy diets are not always a bad thing, but depending on its implementation, they can lead to more severe health consequences later down the road.

When dieting, results tend to show faster, but nutritionists and doctors report that losing weight quickly over an extended period of time may appear to be a healthy jumpstart, but in actuality, is quite the opposite.

These extreme, fast-paced weight-loss regimens can make you think you are shedding those unwanted pounds, but instead of weight, you are dropping a high proportion of water mass, or even losing muscle tissue. By limiting your nutritional intake, this process can be very unhealthy.

Since the majority of diets are considered temporary, most likely you will eventually fluctuate back to your original weight. Professionals call this fluctuation of weight ‘yo-yo dieting’, and while the term might sound harmless enough, the repetition of this dieting method can take a severe toll on your body that can lead to health problems later down the road. In response to this, doctors are now emphasizing the importance of maintaining a healthy regime by adjusting their lifestyle, rather than dieting, in order to maintain peak mental and physical health.

Managing and maintaining a healthy lifestyle does not result from a short-term dietary change. Rather, it’s about making a long-term commitment to change that includes healthy eating, regular physical activity, and balancing the number of calories eaten alongside the calories the body uses.

Although the term ‘lifestyle change’ sounds intimidating, it’s all about making small modifications that lead to a significant result. Results may take longer to notice, but the body is then able to maintain a healthy, and sustainable weight loss rate, which is around 1 to 2 pounds per week.
The key to making a lifestyle change last is creating a realistic plan that you are confident you can maintain. The most critical element to being able to implement this change into your day-to-day regimen is progressing as the process becomes more normalized. Therefore make sure you start small and break down your overall goal into manageable steps. Making a lifestyle change is not an easy job, but it is the most beneficial for your health. If you can, involve a friend for support. It will make the process much less intimidating. There are also support groups in your community and online that have other people just like you who are making healthy lifestyle changes.

So remember when you think that making a lifestyle change sounds hard compared to dieting, don’t forget that there is a massive difference in weight loss and being healthy, and dieting gets in the way of long-lasting change.

Check out these 4 habits you can start right now for a better, healthier life.

For more health tips, follow us on Facebook! Laredo Emergency Room is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.


Ovarian-Cancer.png
17/Nov/2019

Most often, when the topic of cancer and women’s health comes up, people first think about breast cancer. It’s got a lot of marketing power behind it – its own month, its own signature color, and several highly publicized annual fundraisers complete with celebrity spokeswomen. Because of the prominence breast cancer is given – and the education about the disease that comes with it – women are more likely to have routine screening and to recognize possible signs that will prompt them to seek out medical attention.

However, at Laredo Emergency Room, we are seeking to shine the spotlight on another disease that’s taking the lives of thousands of women each year: ovarian cancer, which begins in the ovaries, the two small reproductive organs in which a woman’s eggs are produced. While the American Cancer Society ranks ovarian cancer fifth for cancer deaths among women, it’s still a very deadly disease – because while fewer women get cancer of the ovaries, it causes more deaths than any other cancer of female reproductive organs.

While a variety of tests, such as pelvic exams, ultrasounds, and biopsies, can help a physician diagnose ovarian cancer once it is suspected, the main problem lies in that there are no routine screenings for ovarian cancer. This means that more often than not, ovarian cancer has progressed to an advanced stage before it is caught.

A second problem is that ovarian cancer brings with it an assortment of ambiguous symptoms such as bloating, pelvic or abdominal pain, a need to urinate frequently or urgently, and feeling full quickly during meals. The Ovarian Cancer Research Fund Alliance also warns that fatigue, pain in the back or with intercourse, constipation, and menstrual irregularities can also signal the presence of ovarian cancer. Ovarian cancer symptoms can even include gas, nausea, vomiting, or loss of appetite, along with weight fluctuations.

These are symptoms that we know many women wouldn’t even come to Laredo Emergency Room to treat, even though a deadly disease is lurking underneath. That’s because the symptoms of ovarian cancer are so generalized and easily mistaken for signs of other women’s health conditions or even simply for issues with diet or stress.

Because ovarian cancer is so sly and therefore difficult to catch in its earliest stages, the best course of action for women is to become knowledgeable of their own risk factors for the disease:

  1. 1. Women of advancing age – About half of all women diagnosed with ovarian cancer are age 63 and older.
  2. 2. Women who never had children or had children later – Not having a full-term pregnancy by the age of 35 puts women at greater risk for ovarian cancer.
  3. 3. Women who have undergone IVF – In vitro fertilization treatment increases a woman’s risk of certain types of ovarian cancers.
  4. 4. Women who take hormone therapy – Using estrogens after menopause can increase a woman’s risk for ovarian cancer.
  5. 5. Women with a personal or family history of cancers – If a woman has had breast cancer – or has a family history of breast or ovarian cancer – she is at greater risk.

While knowing your personal risk factors for ovarian cancer and any women’s health concerns can help you become more self-awareand more likely to start the right kinds of conversation with your physician


Screen-Shot-2018-06-29-at-9.54.13-AM.png
17/Nov/2019

Studies have found that people have the potential to be their happiest in their 50s. If you are in your 50s with many of life’s challenges well behind you, you may agree. Perhaps you have a little more free time – more time to focus on what fulfills you. More time to find new interests. More freedom and flexibility.

 

However, your 50s can also be a time of some physical decline for those not staying vigilant about their health. A slower pace of life can also induce boredom and even depression. Physical aches and other medical conditions can begin to show up, seemingly out of nowhere, leaving you with a feeling of hopeless.

 

On the other hand, there is good news! In your 50s, you are still young enough to stay fit – or even to get fit if you aren’t already. And you are also young enough to learn new habits, adopt new ways of thinking, and adapt to new lifestyle changes that will leave you happier than ever – like these:

 

  • Eating smarter – Including more healthy fats, like those found in salmon, almonds, and avocados, has been shown to improve heart health. Eating more fruits and vegetables, fortified cereals, and other sources of whole grains, are great choices for bodies with slower metabolisms. Be sure to drink your milk, too – or find calcium in other foods like low-fat cheeses.
  • Exercise – It’s never too late to start the latest exercise craze – or to return to a sport you loved in your youth. Regular exercise can help reduce your risk of memory problems later in life, keep your joints strong and flexible, and lower your risk of heart problems and cancer. Whether you enjoy a brisk walk, a jog in the park, yoga, or even weight lifting, exercise is great at any age – and using technology to track your progress is a great way to stay on track and accountable to yourself. Smartphone apps and wearable gadgets abound and can help you improve your health one step at a time.
  • Continue to learn – This phase of life is the perfect time to learn something new – like a musical instrument, a foreign language, a craft or technical skill, or even a new vocation that can turn you into a budding entrepreneur. Science shows us that learning actually keeps our brains healthy, in addition to making us happier people.
  • Socialize – In our 50s, many of us are starting to find ourselves with empty nests. That makes it a great time to build our social circles. Host a book or dinner club. Organize a block party. Make new friends. Even a new friend with four legs can be a great addition to your life – and pet owners have been found to have lower cholesterol and risk of heart disease. Go figure, and go adopt today!
  • Take care – Even if you aren’t the type to dutifully visit your physician’s office once every year, make it a habit in your 50s. Staying on top of your health with regular well checks in your 50s can help you identify early signs of manageable, treatable conditions – before they become debilitating.  In other words, visiting the doctor now while you are still healthy can help keep you that way for decades more to come.

 

For more health tips, follow us on Facebook! Laredo Emergency Room is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.


Screen-Shot-2018-06-25-at-12.53.25-PM.png
17/Nov/2019

When we contemplate eating healthfully, we usually think about the types of foods to avoid – things like saturated fats, refined carbohydrates, sodium, added sugars, etc. As part of Nationals Men’s Health Month, we are excited to celebrate all the amazing foods and beverages that are both delicious and healthy – and are especially good for your heart.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men in the US, and one way to help lower your risk is by eating well daily. Making changes in your diet to consume more heart-healthy foods and fewer unhealthy foods can be easier when you enjoy these tasty options:

Salmon and other fish rich in omega-3 fats – Try to eat at least eight ounces of salmon and other fish like tuna and trout each week.  These types of fish contain high amounts of omega-3s, which have an anti-clotting benefit to keep your blood flowing and can lower your triglycerides.

Other examples of heart-healthy foods include:

1.) Walnuts – like salmon, walnuts, along with other nuts like almonds and cashews, are high in omega-3 fats and can improve your cholesterol levels. Eat five ounces each week for a heart-heathy snack or use as a salad topping

2.) Berries – Raspberries, blueberries, cranberries, and strawberries are all high in antioxidants, fiber, and vitamin C, which can help lower your risk of stroke.

3.) Oatmeal – Start your day with a hearty bowl of oatmeal, which is loaded with soluble fiber that can help reduce heart disease and improve cholesterol.

4.) Fruits and vegetables – You can’t go wrong with a diet high in fruits and vegetables, but choosing spinach, tomatoes, asparagus, avocados, and broccoli will deliver nutrients that are great for your heart health.  Fruits like oranges and cantaloupes are also high in fiber and nutrient rich.

5.) Coffee and green tea – Even that cup of joe you look forward to every morning can help decrease your risk of developing heart failure and stroke, when consumed in moderation. Green tea has been shown to help reduce high blood pressure, too.

6.) Red wine – When consumed in moderation, red wine, with its antioxidants, is a better choice for your heart than other alcoholic beverages and can improve good (HDL) cholesterol levels.

7.) Dark chocolate – Perhaps we’ve saved the best for last – and it’s the perfect dessert to end a heart-healthy meal. Dark chocolate, in moderation, has been shown to protect against atherosclerosis – a build-up of plaque inside the arteries.

We think these heart-healthy foods are winners for their taste and for their health value – and with all of these heart-healthy choices, it will be easy to observe National Men’s Health Month with great eating. For more ideas on how to incorporate heart-healthy choices into your diet, check out the American Heart Association’s “Healthy for Good” recipes at https://recipes.heart.org/.

Here’s to your health – and to great, heart-healthy food!

For more health tips, follow us on Facebook! Laredo Emergency Room is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.


© 2017 Laredo Emergency. All rights reserved.