STAY HEALTHY. STAY OUT OF THE ER.


We love interacting with the people of the Laredo community, but we’d much rather do it outside the ER than inside it. Keep up with the latest knowledge from our professionals to help keep yourself in the peak of health.




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17/Nov/2019

As the prevalence of diabetes continues to rise, it’s becoming known as the new silent killer. And because about 10% of all adult emergency room visits stem from diabetes-related symptoms or complications, what you don’t know about diabetes could hurt you … or even kill you. So, as we celebrate American Diabetes Month in November, there’s never been a better time to know more about diabetes, what to watch for, and how to live vibrantly with it.

Why awareness matters

In the United States, an estimated 84 million people live with diabetes, and in addition to being one of the leading causes of trips to the emergency room or urgent care, it’s also one of the leading causes of death. Because symptoms often don’t appear until the condition is somewhat advanced, many people have diabetes or pre-diabetes and don’t even know it.

Who’s most at risk

Advancing age puts people at risk for type 2 (adult onset) diabetes, as more than 85% of those with diabetes are age 45 or older. You’re at high risk for diabetes if you are overweight, lead a sedentary lifestyle, or if diabetes runs in your family.

Children and young adults are more often diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, which tends to run in families. Pregnant women can get gestational diabetes and are typically tested for it near the end of the second trimester.

What you can do

If you have any risk factors for type 2 diabetes, get tested regularly. All that’s needed is a simple blood test. If the results show you have diabetes or pre-diabetes but have not yet experienced symptoms, this gives you an early opportunity to get the disease under control.

In addition to following orders from your primary care physician, the following tips can also help:

  • Think of food as fuel for a healthy lifestyle. Too often, people who need to lose weight in order to get their diabetes (or risk for it) in check head straight into the latest fad diet. While such diets may help you have a short-term success, they are often so restrictive that most people can’t – and shouldn’t – stick with them for the long term. Instead of depriving yourself, plan your meals to include healthy fats, whole grains, lean proteins, and plenty of vegetables and fruits. You’ll feel satisfied and be able to stick with it for life.

  • Get preventive care. Keeping a regular schedule of checkups can help your primary care physician identify subtle symptoms or problems lurking in the background – so you can address them early and avoid trips to urgent care or the emergency room.

  • Increase your physical activity in manageable steps. Find small opportunities for adding activity to your day, such as taking the stairs instead of the elevator – or parking at the back of the lot and walking farther. Gradually adding more and more exercise to your routine is the best way to incorporate it into your lifestyle for good.

The best news about type 2 diabetes is that it can be reversed – with the right care and lifestyle. So be aware of your risks and talk to your doctor about any concerns you might have.

For more health tips, follow us on Facebook! Laredo Emergency Room is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.


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17/Nov/2019

Halloween has got to be one of our favorite holidays – the weather is getting cooler, friends and family are throwing great parties, and the kids are all dressed up and ready to trick-or-treat! This holiday was practically made for the kids, but we know that as parents, letting the kids run around the neighborhood in masks, asking random neighbors for candy, and carving up pumpkins with sharp knives are not the most comforting thoughts. It’s true that Halloween comes with its own set of risks and potential dangers, but if you’re armed with a few safety tips, your family will have no trouble enjoying this special holiday to the fullest.

Costume Safety

We know that it’s tempting to go for the most elaborate costume in the costume store (who doesn’t want to be Pennywise or Jon Snow?) but if you plan on going around the neighborhood with the kids, pick a costume that is less involved – you don’t want to be a walking safety hazard! Some good things to keep in mind when selecting a safe costume are:

Avoid masks that can obstruct your vision, and avoid sharp objects like swords or knives

If you’re going to be out after dark, be sure to have on light-colored clothing, or have reflective surfaces on your outfit

Always buy non-toxic makeup to avoid irritating your skin

Remove all makeup from yourself and the kids before going to bed to prevent eye and skin irritation

Trick-or-Treating Tips

It should go without saying that if you’re going to let the younger kids out to hunt for candy, be sure that they always have a responsible adult with them. Review routes with older kids who might be going alone or with friends and agree on a specific time to return home. Only travel in familiar, well-lit areas and make sure the children know never to enter a stranger’s house or vehicle. If you plan on inspecting the candy loot, be sure to instruct your kids not to dig into their stash until they return home. It’s also worth mentioning here that if you plan on driving during prime trick-or-treating hours, be extra aware of children on neighborhood roadways.

Candy Safety

There are a lot of concerns to consider when sifting through a pile of Halloween candy – are there sharp objects in here? What if my child is allergic to something? Is there such a thing as “healthy” candy? When in doubt, here are some good rules of thumb:

If you’re concerned about allergies, most likely other parents are too. Play it safe and choose allergy-friendly treat options

Only consume candy that has not been opened and still has the factory seal intact

Throw away any candy that has been opened or tampered with

With these tips in mind, the most important thing to remember now is to have fun! Have a safe, fun, spooky, and happy Halloween!

For more health tips, follow us on Facebook!

Laredo Emergency Room is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.


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17/Nov/2019

Let’s face it, the beginning of the school year is a hectic time. Teachers and parents are stressed, and there are a million and one things to keep up with. Meanwhile, all of the kids are running around just trying to have fun or stay on task! It’s easy to see how germs and sickness can spread in the hustle and bustle of everything going on during this back-to-school time of year, but sick kids can mean sick families, which can lead to missed school days and time off of work. If trying to keep your school-aged children healthy all the time seems like a daunting task, don’t be afraid, there are simple things you can do to help prevent sickness before it gets to your household.

Boost Your Immune System

There are several easy ways that you can boost your immune system without a lot of forethought or planning, the first of which is just maintaining a relatively healthy lifestyle. If you have the basics like not smoking, exercising regularly, getting enough sleep, and eating a balanced diet covered, you’re already well on your way to having a healthy immune system. There are also certain types of foods that can help to give your immune system a boost, foods that are rich in vitamins and antioxidants. You can start with a traditional glass of orange juice for vitamin C, but including foods like berries, nuts, dark chocolate, and green tea can all help you eat your way to better health and immunity.

Teach Good Hygiene Habits

Helping school-aged kids form good personal hygiene habits can play a crucial role in fending off germs and sickness. Teaching your kids to wash their hands after meals, going to the restroom, playing on the playground or with other children can help eliminate unwanted germs and bacteria from their skin. Basic hygiene habits like regular showers, brushing teeth, and washing their hair are also essential in maintaining a healthy level of cleanliness and promoting disease prevention.

Take Preventative Measures

The majority of schools in the U.S. require all students to be fully vaccinated before they can attend, but there are other preventative steps that parents can take to keep their families protected from school-borne illnesses, like having regular check-ups and making sure every member of the family is getting their annual flu shot. Even if you feel like you or your family is perfectly healthy, it’s important to get your flu shot every year to improve your chances of avoiding the dreaded influenza virus.

We hope you have a happy and healthy new school year, but if you do need emergency medical care this school year, Laredo Emergency Room will be here for you and your family 24/7/365.

For more health tips, follow us on Facebook! Laredo Emergency Room is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.


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17/Nov/2019

When it comes to your child, emergency room visits are considered a part of the package – and millions upon millions of children are seen in ERs like Laredo Emergency Room each year, mostly from unintentional injuries like falls, burns, drowning, poisoning, suffocation, and vehicle crashes. Accidental falls dramatically outrank any other cause of nonfatal injury until the preteen years – and fatal injuries are most commonly caused by suffocation for babies, drowning for toddlers, and vehicle crashes for older children.

With the number of emergency room visits children require, it’s important to know that not every illness or injury is an emergency… but here are some more urgent symptoms to look for, especially in the midst of illness or following an injury:

* Fever that doesn’t respond to medication with a temperature of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit in a baby 2 months or younger, 102 degrees in older babies through 3 years, and 104 degrees in older children.

* Crying that’s inconsolable and constant following an injury

* A bulging or sunken appearance of the soft spot in younger babies or continual rubbing of the head in young children after a fall – or any bruising on the head of a baby less than 2 months old

* Appearance of loss of balance or slurred speech

* Unequal pupils

* Vomiting that comes on after injury or is severe, ongoing, or contains blood

* Significant fatigue or difficulty waking after a fall

* Choking, trouble breathing, or turning blue

* A deep cut and profuse or nonstop bleeding

* A non-blanching, widespread rash over the entire body (if it doesn’t turn white or disappear for a few seconds when you press it, it is non-blanching)

* Stiff neck accompanied by fever and light sensitivity, which can indicate meningitis Keeping Young Children Safe Despite all the unavoidable trouble our curious little ones can get into, there are many ways we can help keep our children safe.

* Supervise young children at all times, especially during active play

* Teach children, even toddlers, how to swim or float

* Insist your children wear helmets for all physical activities like biking and roller skating

* Buckle up your children in seat belts for every trip, no matter how short, and have them ride in the proper seat for their sizes

* Put babies to sleep on their backs, not their tummies. Swaddling can help them stay in the right position Even with these safety measures, accidents happen.

Whether you have an older child or a newborn, emergency room visits are almost inevitable. To care for your baby Laredo Emergency Room can examine your child and treat a variety of emergency conditions, including severe infections, dehydration, and serious injuries. We know that worrying about your child’s health is a natural part of parenting – and we’re here to provide child emergency care and help take some of life’s worries away for parents like you.

 

For more health tips, follow us on Facebook! Laredo Emergency Room is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.


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17/Nov/2019

Diabetes is a huge concern that many of us are aware of. With 30.3 million individuals in the U.S. living with some form of diabetes, only about two-thirds of those are professionally diagnosed, meaning almost 7.2 million individuals go undiagnosed with this condition. Diabetes cases in our country on the rise, and it is vital that we stay as informed on this disease and it’s risks as possible, taking note of the lifestyle changes that can help you prevent it’s onset.

Although many Americans are able to continue living their life after being diagnosed with one of the four types of diabetes with minimal issues, there can be serious consequences if this condition goes untreated or mismanaged. Health problems such as blindness, kidney failure, heart disease, heart disease, stroke, dental disease, and nerve damage can arise if you are not taking steps to properly deal with your diagnosis.

While there are certain factors you can’t change — such as your genes, age, or past behaviors — there are many actions you can take to reduce the risk of developing this disease. The first and most important step is cutting sugars and refined carbs from your diet. These foods can put you on the fast track towards developing diabetes due to the body having to rapidly break these foods down into smaller sugars that getting absorbed into the bloodstream, causing continuous high blood pressure. Working out is also a huge lifestyle adjustment that you can make to combat developing diabetes. Losing even a small amount of weight can help reduce this risk.

Drinking water as your beverage of choice can be vital. Sugary drinks like sodas have been linked to an increased risk of developing both type 1 and 2 diabetes. Although water should be your primary drink, research suggests that including unsweetened coffee or tea in your diet may help you avoid this chronic condition because they contain antioxidants that help defend against diabetes by reducing blood sugar levels and increases insulin sensitivity.

Unfortunately, these preventive steps that you can take don’t result in overnight changes to your risk of developing diabetes, but these are changes that are meant to inspire and create a new, healthy lifestyle. Cases of diabetes are rising, but you do have control over several of the determining factors that will affect your chances of diagnoses.

If you have been diagnosed with prediabetes, instead of accepting it as a transitional process to the eventual diabetes diagnoses, motivate yourself to make these changes that reduce your risks. Eating the right foods and adopting other healthy, positive lifestyle behaviors promote healthy blood sugar and insulin levels, which will give you the best chance at preventing this disease.

For more health tips, follow us on Facebook! Laredo Emergency Room is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.


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17/Nov/2019

Across the nation, sport related injuries are on the rise—and they can contribute to many factors. The physical stress is often too much for the growing bodies of young athletes and wearing the proper safety gear isn’t always enforced. And this just scratches the surface.

Studies have now connected concussions to prolonged participation in football. The condition known as Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, or CTE, has led to life-altering physical and mental conditions for many prominent professional athletes. Although sports leagues and schools have sparked nationwide campaigns to help encourage safety in sports at all ages. And though sport related injuries are now on high alert, dangers of suffering injuries are no less alarming. The Consumer Product Safety Commission reported the following:

1.) Football accounted for 1, 0240,022 doctor office, emergency room, and hospital visits

2.) Soccer accounted for 368,726 injuries

3.) Cheerleading caused 75,307 injuries

4.) Gymnastics contributed to 67,542 injuries

This is why parents must get involved to keep young athletes safe, in addition to efforts from programs such as Heads Up Football and our very own, here at Laredo Emergency Room. The following are some simple ways you can help protect your child from injuries:

  • 1.) Heart Screenings – Unfortunately, a life of sports is not meant for everyone, especially those of us with heart conditions. It’s never easy to take away something they love, but sometimes that’s the best way to protect our loved ones.
  • 2.) Stretching and Warming Up – To help prepare their body for exercise, make sure they loosen their joints and increase their blood flow by stretching. Encourage them to gently prepare for physical activity by warming up.
  • 3.) Playing with Kids Their Age – Your child can be as large as an older kid and still not as physically mature. Letting them play with them may be too big of a risk and literal hit to take.
  • 4.) Avoiding Excessive Fatigue – Some schools of thought have suggested fatigue contributes to sports-related injuries. Until the cause and correlation are clear, we should not let our children over-extend themselves.
  • 5.) Buying the Right Shoes – Running routes on wet grass in sneakers is an injury waiting to happen. Investing in the right shoes can help keep them out of our ER and on the playing field!
  • 6.) Staying Hydrated – Losing just 1% of their body’s water content can increase the likelihood of injury.
  • 7.) Avoiding Playing while Injured – When not under profession sports contract, playing injured should be out of the question. Let them heel before they get back on the field.
  • 8.) Watching Their Temperature – Combining sports with temperatures in the upper 90’s too 100’s can equal a heat stroke. In the summer, at its hottest, young athletes face the most significant risk.
  • 9.) Consuming Nutritious Foods – Sports injuries can often be a sign of nutritional imbalances. Help avoid the problem by preparing pre-workout-foods that have a healthy balance of proteins, carbs, and calories.
  • 10.) Joining a Team Sport – Youth sports participation can not only help improve your child’s health and physical fitness, but can also boost their self-esteem, and improve their leadership skills!

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17/Nov/2019

We all know that the month of July is a time for fun in the sun! Many of us are flocking to vacations, pool parties, camping trips and sporting events that will occupy a large part of our time during the warmer months. These activities can be exciting, but they can often take a dangerous turn if we are not thinking about our exposure to the elements – Heat Exhaustion can strike without notice or warning, and quickly turn to the more deadly Heatstroke without treatment.

The CDC tells us that heat-related illness kills up to 600 people every year in the US alone, but we can easily avoided it if we can recognize the risk. Obvious risk factors like time of day and activity level do play a major role in the onset of heat-related illnesses, but there are other contributors that may not be as easily noticeable. Some important factors to recognize are:

1.)Using prescription medication – The elderly are especially susceptible to heat-related illness due in large part to the use of medications that are used to treat heart conditions, blood pressure or urinary problems. If you are out and about on a hot day with your grandparents or other older friends, be sure that they are properly hydrated, shaded and have frequent breaks from activity.

2.)Alcohol use – It’s safe to say that people who are on vacation or at a backyard party are usually not thinking about the risk of sun exposure as their first concern, especially once someone has had a few drinks, protection from the sun may be an afterthought. For those times this summer when the only thing on your mind is having a good time, be sure that sunscreen, shade, and hydration come first!

3.)Being overweight or obese – anyone carrying more weight can be prone to overheating quickly. As the body is expending more energy to move, it also cannot process the heat it’s taking on through thicker bodily layers. This combination can be a fast track to heat-induced issues for people who are overweight.

We know that recognizing risk factors is half the battle when it comes to fighting heat-related illness, but the other half is being able to identify heat exhaustion and heatstroke in time to avoid permanent physical consequences.

 

Heat Exhaustion

 

Heat Exhaustion can be thought of as the precursor to Heatstroke, and though it is less serious, treatment should be rendered immediately if you see someone displaying symptoms.  Identifiable symptoms of heat exhaustion are:

  • Muscle cramping
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Excessive sweating
  • Cold, clammy skin
  • Dizziness or fainting
  • Headache

 

The best treatment for Heat Exhaustion is to help that person to cool themselves and lower their body temperature. A person suffering from mild Heat Exhaustion can recover if they take the steps rest and thoroughly rehydrate – move into the shade, remove excess clothing, drink water or a sports drink, and run cold water over the skin if it’s available. If the symptoms do not improve within an hour, it’s time to call a doctor.

 

Heatstroke

 

After the stages of Heat Exhaustion progress, we are now dealing with the most dangerous heat-related illness: Heatstroke, and it can be deadly. Heatstroke can cause damage to nearly every major bodily system if not treated immediately. Recognizable symptoms of Heatstroke include:

  • Hot, dry skin (this person is no longer sweating)
  • Racing heartbeat
  • Confusion
  • Slurred speech
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Seizures

 

It is vitally important that anyone who is suffering from Heatstroke seek emergency medical attention immediately because as we mentioned before, permanent damage to the body and its functions can occur very quickly.

 

The bottom line for fun in the sun: if you’re going to be out in it, be prepared! Pack sunscreen, shady hats, and plenty of fluids. The risk of Heat-related illnesses can definitely be scary, but with awareness and knowledge, you can enjoy your summer fun knowing that you’re ready to handle the heat!

 

For more health tips, follow us on Facebook! Laredo Emergency Room is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.


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17/Nov/2019

Did you know that in the U.S. alone, approximately 6 million kids suffer from asthma? That’s about 1 in 12 children. For a child, an asthma attack can feel frightening. The most important thing we can do for our kids is to arm them with knowledge ahead of the attack and help them stay calm when the next attack comes.

As a community, we can continue to learn more about asthma, learn how to manage it and learn how to recognize the warning signs of an asthma attack. Interestingly, asthma hospitalizations for children are actually decreasing. Children with asthma are also reporting fewer attacks and fewer missed days of school. Despite this progress, 1 in 6 children with asthma still end up in the Emergency Room every year.

What you can do to help your child:

1.) Reducing asthma triggers at home:

2.) Cleaning for allergens (i.e. dust mites, animal dander and molds)

3.) Eliminating all sources of smoke

4.)Reminding them to take breaks during exercise to catch their breath

5.) Reducing emotional anxiety and stress

Using asthma controller medicine as prescribed

Sharing child’s asthma plan with schools, caregivers and healthcare providers.

Weather change can also trigger asthma attacks. Spring can be tough on kids with asthma, particularly if they have a pollen allergy. As our temperatures rise in Texas, increased heat and changes in humidity are also associated with an increase in asthma-related visits to the ER, so always have your child’s medication with you.

We believe that keeping a child’s asthma under control is an achievable goal, but not without help from parents and our community. With knowledge, awareness and management, you can rest assured knowing your child will live an active, normal life!

                                  For more health tips, follow us on Facebook! Laredo Emergency Room is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.


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